Then, slowly at first, like one watchful of himself, the Greek began- “What I have to tell, my brethren, is so strange that I hardly know where to begin or what I may with propriety speak. I do not yet understand myself. The most I am sure of is that I am doing a Master’s will, and that the service is a constant ecstasy. When I think of the purpose I am sent to fulfill, there is in me a joy so inexpressible that I know the will is God’s.”

The good man paused, unable to proceed, while the others, in sympathy with his feelings, dropped their gaze.

“Far to the west of this,” he began again, “there is a land which may never be forgotten; if only because the world is too much its debtor, and because the indebtedness is for things that bring to men their purest pleasures. I will say nothing of the arts, nothing of philosophy, of eloquence, of poetry, of war: O my brethren, hers is the glory which must shine forever in perfected letters, by which He we go to find and proclaim will be made known to all the earth. The land I speak of is Greece. I am Gaspar, son of Cleanthes the Athenian.”

“My people,” he continued, “were given wholly to study, and from them I derived the same passion. It happens that two of our philosophers, the very greatest of the many teach, one the doctrine of a Soul in every man, and its Immortality; the other the doctrine of One God, infinitely just. From the multitude of subjects about which the schools were disputing, I separated them, as alone worth the labour of solution; for I thought there was a relation between God and the soul as yet unknown. On this theme the mind can reason to a point, a dead, impassable wall; arrived there, all that remains is to stand and cry aloud for help. So I did; but no voice came to me over the wall. In despair, I tore myself from the cities and the schools.”

At these words a grave smile of approval lighted the gaunt face of the Hindoo.

“In the northern part of my country- in Thessaly,” the Greek proceeded to say, “there is a mountain famous as the home of the gods, where Theus, whom my countrymen believe supreme, has his abode: Olympus is its name. Thither I betook myself. I found a cave in a hill where the mountain, coming from the west, bends to the south-east; there I dwelt, giving myself up to meditation- no, I gave myself up to waiting for what every breath was a prayer- for revelation. Believing in God, invisible yet supreme, I also believed it possible so to yearn for Him with all my soul that He would take compassion and give me answer.”

“And He did- He did!” exclaimed the Hindoo, lifting his hands from the silken cloth upon his lap.