Not, of course, that we have in the Troades a case of political allusion. Far from it. Euripides does not mean Melos when he says Troy, nor mean Alcibiades’ fleet when he speaks of Agamemnon’s. But he writes under the influence of a year which to him, as to Thucydides, had been filled full of indignant pity and of dire foreboding. This tragedy is perhaps, in European literature, the first great expression of the spirit of pity for mankind exalted into a moving principle; a principle which has made the most precious, and possibly the most destructive, elements of innumerable rebellions, revolutions, and martyrdoms, and of at least two great religions.