The book opens with the opposed pairs righteousness/unrighteousness and death/immortality: those who do not follow righteousness will fall into “senseless reasoning” and will not be open to wisdom; wisdom is not an inherent human quality nor one that can be taught, but comes from outside, and only to those who are prepared through righteousness. The suffering of the righteous will be rewarded with immortality, while the wicked will end miserably. The unrighteous are doomed because they do not know God’s purpose, but the righteous will judge the unrighteous in God’s presence. Lady Wisdom dominates the next section, in which Solomon speaks. She existed from the Creation, and God is her source and guide. She is to be loved and desired, and kings seek her: Solomon himself preferred Wisdom to wealth, health, and all other things. She in turn has always come to the aid of the righteous, from Adam to the Exodus. The final section takes up the theme of the rescue of the righteous, taking the Exodus as its focus: “You (God) have not neglected to help (your people the Jews) at all times and in all places.” (Wisdom of Solomon, 19:22).