Everybody bowed down before Alexander, and all looked at him with awe and respect, as he made his triumphant progress through Greece, all except the sage Diogenes. This man belonged to a class of philosophers who were called “cynics,” which means “doglike,” because, as some say, they did not care for the usual comforts of life.

It is said that Diogenes, the principal philosopher of this kind, chose as his home a great earthenware tub near the Temple of Ceres. He wore a rough woolen cloak, summer and winter, as his only garment, and ate all his food raw. His only utensil was a wooden bowl, out of which he drank.